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All you need to know about fat-soluble vitamins

Learn all about the four types of fat-soluble vitamins: A, D, E, and K. We look at dietary sources of each and their role within the body.

What are the health benefits of carrot juice?

Aside from great taste, carrot juice may provide numerous health benefits. Learn about the nutritional value and possible risks of drinking carrot juice.

What are the benefits of nopal?

Learn about the nopal cactus, commonly known as the prickly pear cactus. This article looks at its nutritional content and possible health benefits.

Which foods are best for mental well-being? It depends on your age

What we eat can affect our psychological health, but which foods are beneficial? A new study suggests that the answer may depend on our age.

Breast cancer treatment: Can Brussels sprouts, soy reduce side effects?

Researchers have found that soy and cruciferous vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts, could reduce the long-term side effects of breast cancer treatment.

What causes a sweet taste in the mouth?

Sugary foods can cause a temporary sweet aftertaste. However, a persistent sweet taste in the mouth can be a sign of a number of serious conditions.

How can we switch off hunger in the brain? Study sheds light

New research investigates how to turn off a class of appetite-stimulating neurons. The findings have far-reaching implications for obesity and overeating.

What are the best ways to make yourself burp?

A look at how to make yourself burp. Included is detail on how burping works and the best strategies to force belching in order to relieve gas.

Multiple sclerosis symptoms improved with fruit and veg

A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains may significantly improve symptoms for people with multiple sclerosis, researchers report.

Would Low GI Diet Benefit Diabetics?

Glycemic index (GI) is a value assigned to foods based on how slowly or how quickly those foods cause increases in blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Foods with low GI value, including whole grain bread, milk, beans, leafy vegetables and berries, tends to release glucose slowly and steadily. Foods with high GI value, on the other hand, release glucose rapidly. High GI foods include white bread, sweetened drinks, biscuits, potatoes and oranges.People who are diabetic or pre-diabetic would benefit by consuming low GI foods.

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