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Learning about coronary heart disease from women

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in both men and women. While many risk factors of CHD, such as smoking, high blood pressure and age, are common among men and women, some metabolic risk factors, such as being diabetic, are more strongly associated with increased risk of CHD in women than in men. Even though metabolic risk factors seem to be stronger in women, few studies have sought metabolic markers - that is, measurable indicators that can be detected in blood samples - of CHD in women.

Treating sleep-disordered breathing may have cardiovascular benefits for heart failure patients

Severe sleep-disordered breathing is linked with stiffening of the arteries' walls and may be related to the development of heart failure, according to a recent study in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology.

Turn off the telly and get moving

Spending too much time in front of the television could increase your chance of developing potentially fatal blood clots known as venous thrombosis. Even trying to counterbalance hours of TV watching through adequate exercise is not effective warns Yasuhiko Kubota of the University of Minnesota in the US. Kubota is the lead author of a study in Springer's Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis. Prolonged sitting can in some cases lead to blood clots because the normal circulation of blood through the legs and feet is impaired.

Female sex not a protective factor against heart disease in type 1 diabetes

Constrictions of the coronary blood vessels is a possible consequence of type 1 diabetes, and one that can eventually lead to myocardial infarction or heart failure. Generally speaking, women are afflicted by coronary artery disease later than men, but if a woman has type 2 diabetes, the advantage is negated. A new report by researchers from Karolinska Institutet, Gothenburg University and Uppsala University in Sweden published in the journal Diabetes Care now shows that this also sometimes applies to type 1 diabetes.

High blood pressure limits protection to vital organs and tissues in low-oxygen conditions

New research published in the Journal of Physiology sheds light on the effects of high blood pressure by considering the way the body responds to a lack of oxygen.

Heavy Drinking Tied to Early-Onset Dementia in French Study

(MedPage Today) -- But other factors may drive the link, experts warn

Resolvin D-1 limits kidney damage after heart attacks

A heart attack triggers an acute inflammatory response at the damaged portion of the heart's left ventricle. If this acute inflammation lingers, it can lead to stretching of the ventricle and heart failure. The inflammation can claim another victim—the kidneys.

Epidural Stimulation for Paralysis Also Helps Heart

(MedPage Today) -- Case report shows resolution of orthostatic hypotension, symptoms

Stroke drug demonstrates safety in clinical trial

A preliminary Phase 2 clinical trial has demonstrated that patients with acute ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke, can safely tolerate high doses of 3K3A-APC, a promising anti-stroke drug invented at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). The trial results, announced by pharmaceutical company ZZ Biotech, also show that 3K3A-APC substantially reduced hemorrhage volume and hemorrhage incidence in patients.

Can your cardiac device be hacked?

Medical devices, including cardiovascular implantable electronic devices could be at risk for hacking. In a paper publishing online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Cardiology's Electrophysiology Council examines the potential risk to patients and outlines how to improve cybersecurity in these devices.

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